pelvic health, postpartum, Self Care

Strength Training and the Pelvic Floor

This week I finally kicked my own ass into gear and started gathering practice hours to prepare myself for my practical exam to finally get my Personal Training Specialist certification from CanFitPro. I sent out a plea on Facebook for anyone who would be willing to submit themselves to a session with me. I was thankful to have 4 wonderful ladies step up and come join me in my little home gym!

One thing that came up over and over again was the pelvic floor. I just always seem to find ways to work it into the conversation! I think it is because I was so blown away by the knowledge I have gained since become pregnant and giving birth that I just feel the need to share it with the world!

Did you know you can have pelvic floor dysfunction without having a baby?

Did you know you can induce stress urinary incontinence (SUI) through weightlifting?

Did you know most women don’t know how to properly connect with their pelvic floor?

Did you know a pelvic health physical therapist can help with all of these things?

Did you know that I think every single woman who has given birth should see a pelvic health physical therapist? (I hope you know this, from reading previous posts!)

It felt so good this week to share my knowledge of the pelvic floor with some lovely women, even though none of them had given birth, and some of them never plan to. The information was so well received by all of them! I think maybe they can feel my passion shining through.

One eye opening moment I had was watching this video by YouTube Vlogger Meg Squats. She and a fellow powerlifting friend discuss their issues with stress urinary incontinence and how it related to their weightlifting. I had never thought about the pelvic floor in this context, but it totally makes sense. The anatomy of the female core has the opportunity for weakness if the pelvic floor isn’t adequately engaged, thanks to the vagina. The vagina is essentially a hole in your core, and when you are exerting the levels of intra-abdominal pressure required for powerlifting, if you’re not functionally engaging your pelvic floor, it becomes a point of weakness, leaving women vulnerable to SUI or worse, prolapse.

I brought this up with the ladies I trained who are into power lifting or lifting heavy and they were blown away by the idea. I feel like every trainer who trains women needs to at least take the pelvic floor into consideration, especially when they start introducing concepts like using intra-abdominal pressure to brace for lifts. They were also surprised when they tried to engage their pelvic floor, they felt like they had no idea what they were doing! Which is a very common occurrence. I thought I was a champion at Kegels until I visited my pelvic floor physio postpartum and she helped me see that I was clenching so many unnecessary muscles when I thought I was only engaging my PF.

When I left my physio after my final (so far) visit, I took a handful of her business cards and have been handing them out to my post-partum mom friends like candy! We had a mom’s get together the other day, and I wasn’t surprised to learn that every single one of us had some form of pelvic floor dysfunction. And we are all fit, healthy women who were avid athletes and hit the gym regularly before we had our babies!

We need to talk about this more, ladies. Rather than ‘just wait until you pee every time you sneeze’ how about we say ‘have you made an appointment with a pelvic health physio yet?’

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