fitness, pelvic health

Why the ‘Squat Challenge’ Didn’t Give you a Better Booty

You’ve probably seen all of those ‘squat challenges’ floating around social media, selling a better booty with more squats, right? You may have even tried them, hoping that it might help correct the flatness your bum seems to have acquired over the last few years. You squat, squat, squat and still have a flat butt… What gives? Well the problem just may be a butt wink.

What exactly is a butt wink?

Well when you are performing a squat, and you lower down to the floor, for a lot of people their bum rolls underneath them and tucks as they get lower into the squat, rounding the lower back. This is referred to as a ‘butt wink’.

Why is this a problem?

Well the problem is three-fold.

First and foremost, when your bum tucks under, your glutes are virtually knocked out of action (hence why doing squats didn’t fix your flat bum). They are unable to fire appropriately in this position to help push your body out of the squat. This is bad. This is bad because your glutes are supposed to be one of the prime movers in a squat and if you are taking them out of the equation then you are forcing more work onto the quads and the anterior chain, which is already tight as a result of our sitting culture. We want to squat in a manner than balances all of the muscles in the lower body, the quads, hamstrings, glutes and even the calves.

Second, when your sacrum and pelvis roll under in a squat, this forces your spine out of ‘neutral’ and creates extension in the lumbar spine. Now, our spines are designed to flex and extend, but when doing a squat, this is not the action we are intending to strengthen and can cause problems like disc and ligament damage. No one wants to knowingly cause disc and ligament damage in their spine.

Third, butt winking or bum tucking shortens the pelvic floor, and bulges the anterior core or transverse abs. It puts the entire core into a less optimal position which prevents it from functioning the way it should. Squatting properly can strengthen the core, and you want your core stability system working optimally, especially when you start doing things like adding weight.

So I challenge you to either get in front of a mirror or take a video of yourself and see how your pelvis performs in a squat. Especially if you are doing squats with weight on your shoulders, like a typical barbell squat, as this can accentuate any butt wink you may have. Your spine and pelvis should remain aligned throughout the movement, with flexion occurring in the hips, knees and ankles.

Next, work on correcting the wink. The first step is to identify at what point your butt tucks under. Sometimes all it takes is to be mindful of this, and consciously keep your bum and pelvis in the right position. Sometimes your physical anatomy is working against you, not everyone’s hips are the exact same shape. Some peoples hip sockets face forward, some out to the side, some are shallow, some are deep, some have long femur necks, some short and these all affect how we get down into a squat. Try playing with your stance, widen your feet a bit, turn out your toes a bit, and see if this helps. Very rarely it is due to muscles that are too tight to allow that depth of squat with a neutral pelvis, but this isn’t often the case.

The last reason may be that you’ve been squatting improperly for so long that you are now imbalanced between the front and back of your body, usually the quads overpowering the hams and glutes. To overcome this, you can try squatting either with the weight in front of you, like a goblet squat, or using something to hold onto, like a TRX handle or doorframe and focus on putting your weight into your heels and trying to keep your shins as vertical as possible. Doing squats aided in this manner will force your posterior chain (glutes, hamstrings) to do more of the work, allowing them to strengthen and balance out the quads.

So next time you bring your ass to the grass, remember not to wink.

Your booty will thank you.

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