Birth, motherhood, pelvic health, Pregnancy, Prolapse

Pregnancy After Prolapse – Birth Story {Part 1}

Going into this pregnancy, after previously experiencing prolapse and having a pretty good idea that my birth of my first contributed significantly to that, labour and birth is what I was most worried about. I had discussed it previously with my PFPT before getting pregnant, and again during pregnancy. I wanted to do everything I could to mitigate any risk, while keeping things as ‘natural’ as possible. While I 100% respect some women’s decision to have a c-section after prolapse to mitigate risk, that just didn’t feel like the right choice for me.

Leading up to birth in the third trimester, I focused my movement practice on keeping my PF and TA engaged, but also allowing them both to relax when appropriate. This is something I struggled with baby number one, and I wanted to ensure I had balance between the two this time around. I did a birth prep course that focused on mindfulness and relaxation through labor and birth and really dialed in my alignment and breathing strategies to ensure my core unit was functioning optimally.

In addition, I planned on having a homebirth. For me, this was the option that would ensure I would be as relaxed as possible during labor and birth. Not stressing about rushing off to the hospital, not worrying about being on the hospital’s timeline, not feeling like I was ‘wasting a room’ if my labor didn’t go as fast as anticipated. These were all things I didn’t want to worry about. Being able to stay home, in my own environment and eat and drink my own food and have my family and things close by made all the difference. I had midwives who aligned with my values, and ensured to communicate them all of my worries, concerns and wishes.

My midwife team was amazing. They heard and validated all of my fears and concerns about birth, were accepting my my story of my previous birth all while reassuring me that this birth would be the birth I was hoping for. They assured me that birth is usually much easier the second time around, and seeing as I was in such a good frame of mind there was no reason to be worried or stressed. I did still have a degree of concern, though, because we all know birth is one of those things that has the potential to go completely differently than is planned. Luckily, that wasn’t the case for me.

I had my 39 week midwife appointment on a Wednesday. We chatted about how I was feeling, I mentioned that my mother in law was scheduled to arrive on that Saturday to help care for Nugget when the baby arrives and my midwife says ‘Ya, we were talking about it, Saturday would be a good day for you to have a baby!’ and we all laughed, because baby’s never follow a plan. As I left my appointment I joked that I would see them Saturday, and went on my way.

Saturday arrived and I woke to find I had lost my mucous plug with a bloody show. I made a note of it, but didn’t get too excited since it can sometimes take days or weeks for labor to start after the mucous plug is lost, and it can regenerate. We headed out the door that morning to run some errands and pick  up my mother in law at the airport. Riding in the van on the way to the airport, I was feeling some tightening, but riding in cars had brought on braxton hicks since about 34 weeks so, again, didn’t think much of it. We got home, and the tightenings continued, and they were pretty frequent, like every 5-7 minutes, but not painful and I could easily talk through them and no one around me really knew what was happening. Even still, I started to pay more attention to them and started keeping track of them.

I gave my husband the heads up on what was going on around 3 in the afternoon. I told him I wasn’t sure if ‘this was it’ yet, but I thought he should be in the loop. We decided to head out for a walk to the park and just enjoy some time with Nugget, because of the impending potential that this could be our last days as a family of 3. We had such a great afternoon, swinging on swings, letting Nugget run around and guide our walk, and just enjoying him. I’m so glad I was mindful enough to ask my mother in law to take a photo of us, I will always cherish this photo of some of our last moments of just the 3 of us.

family of 3 KCFITNESS

After we got home from our walk, I was more convinced that this was it. I had gotten up earlier than normal that day and we had been running around so I decided it would probably be a good idea to take a nap, in case things ramped up and I ended up being up all night like I was when Nugget was born. Before I did that, I gave my midwife a call just to let them know what was going on, they agreed that a nap was a great idea and asked me to call back when things started to intensify. I laid down and surprisingly I was able to fall asleep quite quickly despite the tightenings. I was able to sleep for about an hour, but when I woke I found that the tightenings had all but stopped. They had completely slowed down to 15-30 minutes apart, though they were a little stronger than previously and took a bit more of my attention when they did come. I was so grateful that my water hadn’t broke yet, because that meant I could labor as long as I needed to without worrying about potential complications. As a result, I wasn’t worried about things slowing down, and knew my body would allow my baby to come when she was ready.

{CONTINUED HERE}

 

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fitness, pelvic health, postpartum, Pregnancy

Pregnancy is Temporary, but Your Choices Last Forever

Being avidly interested in perinatal fitness & a new mom myself, I come across a lot of advertising and social media posts about exercise in pregnancy and postpartum. I often find myself scrolling through the comments to see what the general consensus is on the latest (usually controversial) video or message is.

One comment that almost always crops up is:

“I did crossfit/ran marathons/did crunches/did what I always did when I was pregnant and my baby turned out perfectly fine”

And all I can think is you just don’t get it!

While there are definitely recommendations for exercise in pregnancy circled around maintaining baby’s health, Mom’s health is just as important!

(I know, groundbreaking stuff, right?)

When I (and many other well-educated fitness professionals) say maybe it isn’t the best idea to do crunches, or run long distances, or lift super heavy, I’m not saying this because I think you are putting your baby’s health at risk. I am saying these things because you are putting yourself, your body and your future function at risk!

Yes, you can powerlift (or sprint, or do jumping jacks, or whatever) when pregnant, and baby will probably be fine, and it might feel okay for you at the time, but should you? Probably not.

Something one of my idols in the fitness industry, Brianna Battles says regularly about exercise in pregnancy is:

Just because you CAN, doesn’t mean you SHOULD.
~Brianna Battles, Everyday Battles

It all circles back around to training with intention. When pregnant, a lot of women fear losing themselves when the baby comes (I know I did. I so did!) so they try to keep doing what they’ve always done and enjoyed through their pregnancy, as if to prove to themselves that they are the same! But, as much as you are the same, you are so not the same during (and after) pregnancy. You are growing a human! That is a big-freakin-deal! You need to respect that. You need to surrender yourself to the fact that as important your personal goals are, the priority should be keeping your body healthy and strong in this (so very short) chapter of your life.

There are so many more factors at play in the perinatal period when it comes to exercise and fitness. Hormones influence your connective tissues. A growing uterus influences center of gravity, balance and movement patterns. Diastasis recti influences core function and strength. The weight of baby on the pelvic floor influences it’s ability to respond appropriately (hello, pee sneeze – not normal!). So we need to take all of these things (and more) into account when training in pregnancy.

Yes, we can program exercise along the same lines you are used to and enjoy, they just might look a little different. The how of exercise is often more important than the exercise itself. It’s about strategy rather than just do’s and don’ts. If you follow Brianna (mentioned above) Jennifer Cambpell of Mama Lion Strong & Healthy Habits Happy Moms, or Jessie Mundell, or Julie Wiebe or Katy Bowman, they all preach ‘ribs over hips’ and keeping your ribs, spine and pelvis neutral.

[Side note: I would be literally nowhere if it wasn’t for all I have learned from following these amazing women and for their trail blazing in this field]

So, can you complete a heavy overhead press while 30 weeks pregnant? Yes. Okay, but can you do it while maintaining your ribs over hips, without your diastasis bulging, and without holding your breath? No. Then that exercise isn’t the best choice for you in this chapter of your life. If you say you are just going to do it because it feels fine to you, my next question is why? What is the value of continuing to do an exercise that maybe isn’t the best for your body at this point? Is it because you think you should be able to do it? Is it because you’ve seen other pregnant women do it and you want to look ‘badass’ like they did? Is it because you’re afraid of looking like a weakling or a failure who didn’t have the guts to go for it? Take a look inside yourself, and analyze why you feel you need to do a specific exercise or program. Is it worth the risk? Spoiler alert: putting your glory ahead of your future function is not badass and doesn’t take guts. You know what takes guts? Putting yourself first. Saying no when someone challenges you. Looking within yourself and standing up for your own values. That’s badass. That takes guts. Going with the flow because everyone is doing it, that’s cowardly. Having the courage to stand out on your own is the pinnacle of strength.

Now I’m not saying you can never do your favourite not-so-ideal-in-pregnancy exercise again. That is definitely something you can return to. However, it’s something you need to work up to, and be mindful of how your body is functioning, and be ready to maybe take two steps forward and one (or two or three) steps back along the way. It’s about checking the ego, and respecting where your body is at during this very important period and allowing yourself to surrender to it. This chapter in your life is temporary. Eventually it will end, but the choices you make within it can have lasting consequences if you aren’t smart about it. In closing, I’d like to bring it back around to another quote from Brianna;

Pregnancy is temporary, Postpartum is forever.
~Brianna Battles, Everyday Battles

Try not to forget that, because your body won’t.

having-the-courage-to-stand-out-on-your-own-is-the-pinnacle-of-strength

nutrition, Self Care

What to do About that Dreaded Winter Cold or Flu

Here in YYC, the weather is getting cooler, the leaves are changing, there’s a nip in the air. As much as we’d like to deny it for a few more weeks months, winter is coming.

[cue Game of Thrones reference]

I live in Canada. There is absolutely no question we get full blown, many feet of snow, frigid cold, arctic quality, winter.

I actually love winter.

I know, I know. I’m crazy. But the truth is I just love the changing of the seasons, I love all of them. The short period of each allows me to appreciate the next. If I were to live somewhere where it was always hot, I would probably get depressed because I would not be able to snuggle up in a cozy blanket by the fire and sip on hot cocoa and watch Christmas movies. That would make me sad.

What do I not love about winter?

Flu season. Cold season. General increase in communicable illness in the whole of the population.

Not fun.

You know what’s even less fun? Being sick when pregnant – you can’t take anything! You know what’s even LESS fun than that? Being sick while caring for a newborn! Downright awful! Add onto that the stress and worry that your tiny human will also get sick. It’s the literal worst.

But there are things you can do that can help you stay on the healthier side of things and give your body the best shot at avoiding, or in the very least minimizing the sniffles, sore throat, cough, body aches and general crappy feelings that go along with viral infections.

Now if you ask your friends and family, ‘how do I prevent/get rid of a cold’ you’ll probably be greeted with a myriad of ridiculous sounding suggestions, for example:

‘take a shot of whisky and wear a toque to bed’
‘rub your feet with vicks and wear socks to bed’
‘gargle salt water’
‘take garlic pills’
‘drink a hot toddy – with extra toddy’
My personal favourite – ‘put wet socks in the fridge, then before bed, put them on then cover with wool socks’ – supposedly called ‘warming socks’… Oh Lord… *eyeroll*

I mean, I’m not complaining about the fact that the majority of the suggestions involve alcohol and sleep. But they probably aren’t doing much to support your immune system (well except maybe the sleep, but we’ll get to that).

Most of these claims are based on anecdotal evidence. “Well my mom used to always do XYZ and I always felt better within a few days” or “I always take ABC supplements and I never get sick”.

Let’s look at the first one – most colds last 5-10 days. Usually most people are in denial of their illness within the first day or two, then they acknowledge it, but don’t feel too bad, then they feel worse and finally start looking for a ‘cure’, they try XYZ and miraculously they feel better! Well did XYZ cure them, or did they just happen to try XYZ right before their virus was due to run its course?

Ya, think about that one.

So what can you do to help with the cold or flu?

What does science say?

  1. Take Probiotics
    There’s a lot of information out there about probiotics and the human microbiome right now.There’s been a recent shift in thinking to ‘germs are bad’ to ‘too many of the wrong kind of germs are bad’. You see our entire body is covered and filled with germs, and the majority of those germs live within your digestive tract, and help our bodies break down the food we eat. Recent research has found that a good balance of bacteria within the body can even help support our immune system. A 2014 study showed that taking probiotics allowed participants to decrease the frequency and duration of viral illnesses. The participants reported that although they still felt sick, when they got sick, it lasted a shorter period of time, and they reported illnesses less frequently than the group that did not receive probiotic therapy.
    Now I personally take a probiotic supplement daily, and give a baby version to Nugget, there are also many dietary sources to get beneficial bacteria through the food you eat. Things like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut (make sure it’s fermented) kimchi and, little known, honey (make sure it’s unpasteurized)!
  2. Don’t fight the fever*
    Ever wonder why we get a fever when we get sick? Well it’s not what you think. The most commonly held belief is that it helps basically ‘cook’ the virus or bacteria that is causing the infection, and this is not true. If that were the case, you wouldn’t have to cook your food to kill bacteria! Fever and increased body temperature actually improve your body’s immune response buy allowing certain types of your white blood cells to become more efficient at attacking the infection. Hyperthermia, while it doesn’t kill the viruses, does inhibit their replication, or ‘viral shedding’, which can help limit the duration of the cold or flu symptoms.So while it’s perfectly reasonable to take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve symptoms like aches or pains, it’s not necessary to bring down a fever just for the sake of it. Mayo Clinic suggests that a fever less than 39.5C (103F) is not worrisome in an adult, so if you’re temperature is less than that, leave it alone!

    *The exception to this is if you are pregnant – fever in pregnancy can potentially harm the developing fetus – please treat the fever with acetaminophen and speak with your care provider!
  3. Eat chicken soup
    You probably thought this one was filed up there with the ‘old wives tales’, but there is actually science behind it! One study showed that the combination of ingredients in chicken soup limited the inflammatory response of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell), which is responsible for most of the unpleasant symptoms of a cold or flu. Also, inhaling the warm vapours and drinking the warm fluids associated with chicken soup help loosen mucous in the nose and chest, making them easier to clear (which is why your nose runs when you eat soup).
  4. Eat nutrient dense foods
    It’s no surprise that our bodies require nutrients to function. Our nutrition needs to consist of more than just fats, carbohydrates and proteins. There is a plethora of micronutrients that our bodies require in order to function properly, like vitamins and minerals. The best source for these is through the food we eat, fruits and vegetables, no or low processed foods. The more a food is processed, the less nutrition it contains.
  5. Sleep
    Sleep is how our body recouperates. It kind of seems obvious that it would be even more important when our body is fighting off an infection that sleep would be even more important. Animal studies have shown that all animals engage in more sleep when they are ill, it is the natural thing to do. Sleep also helps reduce stress, which contributes to improved immune system function. So rest up!

So now you know. When you are feeling ill, and someone suggests you put on cold wet socks (still laughing about that one), you can retort with science. The actual facts about what to do when you are feeling ill, and how to minimize the likelihood that you will become sick in the first place!

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fitness, postpartum, Self Care

My Favourite Fitness Gear – Postpartum Edition

We all know the postpartum period has it’s own set of special challenges. I am not just talking about the first few weeks, I’m talking months, because we all know postpartum is forever. After I gave birth to Nugget, there were a few things I could not live without when it came to my fitness and regaining my strength. Here is a list of my faves

lulus
#1 Lululemon Hi-Rise Wunder Under Pants
I cannot say enough good things about these pants. I bought them pregnant, wore them until I gave birth, and continued to wear them immediately postpartum and still wear them today. The high rise waist stays up nice over a pregnant belly, and feels slightly supportive on a soft postpartum belly.

 

 

VS bra
#2 The Ultimate by Victoria’s Secret Run Sport Bra
I was so happy when I found this bra! It’s so supportive, and it has clasps on the front of the straps so it can easily be undone to breastfeed. I probably wear this bra 5/7 days a week! Plus they have super cute colours and it’s relatively inexpensive.

 

 

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#3 Old Navy Fitted Rib-Knit Tank
This tank is the perfect layering tank for underneath any shirt when breastfeeding. It is extremely stretchy so you can use the two-shirt technique to breastfeed with minimal exposure. This was key for me as Nugget was a January baby and it was cold!

 
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#4 Nalgene 32 ounce Water Bottle
Those early weeks, I had a bottle of water within arms reach at all times. Between breastfeeding, night sweats, constant peeing. I was continuously parched. Having this easy to use, large bottle was a lifesaver.

 

 
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#5 Fitbit Charge HR Activity Tracker
I am a data junkie, so I loved having the Fitbit to keep track of my sleep, activity, walks and weight with. It also inadvertently helped me keep track of Nugget’s feeds because I could see how often I was awake at night with the sleep tracking technology.

 

 

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#6 Kushies Washable Cotton Breastpads
Cotton breastpads were a godsend. I found that the disposable ones made me really sweaty underneath and that did not help my already tender and chapped nipples. These cotton ones wicked sweat and milk away and allowed my breasts to stay dry between feedings and during any activity that made me sweat.

 

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#7 Mini Bands
I LOVE LOVE LOVE my mini bands! They are such an easy way to add resistance to any glute exercise! There are so many variations of their use, I could write an entire post about them!

 

 

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#8 WOSS Suspension Trainer
Another great tool for home workouts, an awesome way to increase the variability to body weight workouts, which are the best type of workouts to be doing in the early postpartum period. This trainer comes with an anchor to put through a door frame rather than having to screw it into the wall or ceiling.

 

 

I’ve used all of these products almost every single day, or at least with every workout since having Nugget. I found they made my life easier or more comfortable as it related to being a new mom. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

 

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fitness, motherhood, pelvic health, Self Care

No Time for Exercise? Start Here to Restore your Core

The number one reason mom’s don’t exercise is they don’t (think they) have time. They are busy with baby (or babies/kids) and next thing they know the day is over. Well there are things you can do in your everyday activity that can help restore function without adding ‘exercise’ to your to do list.

  1. Get off the couch
    Duh, right? Well I don’t mean get up and exercise, I mean sit on the floor! Couches and chairs are designed to keep us comfortable, even in positions that our body is not supposed to be in for extended periods of time. So, get off the couch and get onto the floor. When the kiddos are playing and you are checking emails or drinking your coffee, sit on the floor. Just the act of getting up and down off the floor forces your body to move in ways that begin to strengthen your core stability system. There is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ way to sit on the floor. The fact is if you are on the floor, you won’t be able to stay in the same position for long, due to discomfort, and this is a good thing! Keep moving, even when you are resting!
  2. Stop using your back to lift
    Now, you might think you already do this. But you probably only take this into consideration when lifting heavy objects. Take a day, and be conscious of your body position and mechanics every time you lift ANYTHING. I’m talking, the baby, the laundry, that dirty spoon off the floor. Anything. Are you rounding your low back with straight legs? Most likely at least some of the time you are, without even realizing it. Make a conscious effort to avoid this. Whether it is hinging at the hips or squatting down, do whatever it takes to avoid rounding your low back in order to get down to lift anything up. This includes lifting the baby out of the crib! If you are too short to get baby out of the crib without rounding, then get a step stool so you can hinge at the hips to get over the rail.
  3. Exhale when you lift
    Lifting things is strenuous, which is why you shouldn’t use your back to do it, like I mentioned already. But learning to exhale as you lift anything, is the first step to engaging your core properly. Next time you have to pick up baby, think about blowing air out and lifting your pelvic floor and engaging your transverse abs (like your bracing for a punch to the gut) before you lift.
  4. Stop sucking it in
    As your reading this, are you holding in your belly? Maybe. You might do this all the time without even realizing it. I do. A lot. I am trying my best to stop, but it’s habit that has been engrained in me for years, and it’s going to take longer than a few months to stop. When you hold your tummy in, it increases your intrabdominal pressure and forces your core muscles to work overtime. In my case, this led to my pelvic floor becoming tight and spastic in order to compensate for my sucked in tummy! As I wrote this paragraph I had to think to release my tummy 3x! It’s so hard to break habits that have become subconscious!
  5. Carry your baby
    And I don’t mean in a wrap or in their carseat. I mean actually carry them, in your arms. What do you think is working in order to keep you upright while you’re holding 10-20lbs of wiggly baby? Your core! This is a natural, healthy way of building core strength. How do you think people got around with their babies before cars? They carried them! I can tell you, after a good hour or so of carrying Nugget around my whole upper body is burning and my core can definitely feel the work! And it’s not like you need to go out and find opportunities to carry your babe, I carry Nugget around the house while I tidy up. One hand for picking up mess, the other for carrying babe. Then I switch. Just like floor sitting, you can’t hold a baby in the same position for long before both your arms, and the baby get tired of it. The bonus of this is it is also extremely good for baby’s development to be held. The constant movement helps them build core strength and helps them meet milestones faster. Haven’t you ever noticed your baby immediately calms down the second you start carrying them around? This is because they need the movement too! Win-win!
  6. Let baby be your guide
    This one only really applies if baby is old enough to be somewhat mobile, but even once they are doing tummy time consistently you can model them. Babies instictively move functionally. Try to mimic their motions exactly, not skipping steps to make it easier. A lot of ‘prescribed’ core exercises are movements your baby does naturally!
  7. Walk instead of driving
    Next time you have an errand to run within 5km of your house, get out the stroller and walk there to do it! It will definitely take a little longer, but it will be like killing two birds with one stone – exercise and an errand. I routinely walk to the post office, or the bank, or the pharmacy and I feel so much better after I’m done! Plus, Nugget usually falls asleep in the stroller, so add a nap to the stack of things getting accomplished – because we all know a nap is a solid accomplishment!


Becoming healthier doesn’t always have to mean spending an hour a day at the gym, sometimes we can find ways to squeeze activity into everyday life. If you are able to start incorporating some of these changes into your daily life, your core and floor will thank you!

7 ways to Restore your Core without Exercise